Category: Baby Development & Due Date
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When, Oh When, Is This Baby Coming?

Shoes don't fit and you haven't had a good night's sleep in weeks. Plus, you're antsy to finally have a baby. Here's how to hang in there and enjoy the home stretch.

It's been nearly nine months, and the glamour is officially gone. Your back hurts, your feet are tired, and it's been weeks since you've had a good night's sleep — time to get this show on the road!

Unfortunately, your baby's got her own agenda, and it might not be what you had in mind (your due date may sail on by with nary a contraction in sight, for instance!). In the meantime, you're probably getting more than a little tired of belly pats from strangers and the constant reminder that, "Woah, you're getting so BIG!"

It's definitely hard not to feel frustrated, uncomfortable and antsy in the final days of pregnancy. Hang in there, because we've got some tips on de-stressing before the big day. Kick back, put up those (swollen) feet and read on!

Fun distractions

Work it, baby. Exercising might feel like the last thing you want to do, but with your doctor's permission, give it a shot. The right movements can increase your flexibility, strength, circulation, and help you prepare for labor. Try prenatal yoga, which has been known to reduce swelling, back and leg pain, and insomnia, in addition to being a calming practice (make sure you stick with a teacher who has a solid understanding of pregnancy and knows what poses should be avoided). If you're feeling particularly constricted in the diaphragm (all that belly crushing your lungs), spend a few minutes on your hands and knees, breathing deeply — the baby weight will drop low, giving you a nice break from the pressure.

Get a foot rub. Or a back rub, or a full-body treatment. Visit a local massage therapist trained in prenatal massage for a wonderfully relaxing experience. Done correctly, a massage can ease sore spots, relax tense muscles, and just make you feel good all over. Therapists often provide a special table with hollowed-out areas for your belly, or have you lie on your side with a body pillow for support.

Take care of yourself. You're probably past the point where you can reach your own toes for a DIY pedicure, so why not visit the salon for a professional paint job? If pedicures aren't really your thing, how about a fabulous new haircut (something spiffy but low-maintenance for the coming weeks, maybe?), or a pair of earrings that make you smile? If you're struggling with being positive about your appearance these days, treat yourself to some feel-good beauty indulgences.

Staying productive

Keep busy. Minimize your calendar-watching by keeping your schedule filled with manageable to-dos. Get involved in something you enjoy doing — whether it's a hobby, a work project or just lunch with friends — so you're focused on more than just the state of your belly!

Address fears. Take this time to learn as much as possible about labor and delivery, and talk to your support system about any fears you may have. Fear can actually slow labor and cause pain during the birth, so it's important to address your concerns head-on. Learn about your options, and helpful techniques to help with the parts of labor you are most worried about.

Prep the house. It may be hard to believe, but that brand-new baby is going to be mobile before you know it. In addition to the safety measures you've probably already put in place (such as no soft bedding, and crib slats no more than 2 3/8ths of an inch wide), consider taking some further steps to ensure your growing baby's safety. Child-safety experts suggest, among other things, removing hanging cords from blinds, locking up all household cleansers and medications, and installing safety plugs in outlets.

When to call the doctor

You should never hesitate to contact your healthcare provider if you notice anything out of the ordinary in these final days of pregnancy. Some signs that warrant an immediate call include:

• Any vaginal bleeding, especially bright red blood

• Headaches, blurred vision, swelling of arms, hands or face, or pain under your ribcage

• Sudden, unexplained weight gain or fever

• Decreased fetal movements

Of course, noticing signs that you're going into labor is usually a happy reason to call! Make sure you're well-informed on the indicators that labor is progressing, so you feel confident contacting your healthcare provider at the right time.

Staying upbeat

Keeping a positive attitude may be a challenge as you deal with all the late third-trimester discomforts and a growing desire to (finally!) meet your baby, but try and remind yourself that this is truly a temporary situation. Soon enough, your world will be turned upside down in all kinds of amazing, tiring, miraculous ways. Take these last days to breathe, connect with yourself, and enjoy the anticipation!

An article from the HUGGIES® Brand

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Those Baby Movements Explained

There’s a rhyme and reason to your unborn baby’s bops, kicks, and bounces. Here, we explain these common belly mysteries.

Sometimes my baby squirms around like she’s training to be an Olympic gymnast or something. What’s going on?

Many moms notice extra movement after they’ve eaten. The reason: The accompanying rise in blood sugar gives baby more energy to somersault (give that baby a score of 10!). Sometimes, babies kick more frequently when the TV is on or music is playing. Whether it’s because they like it or they want it off isn’t known—but it’s clear that they’re tuning in, notes Rebecca Lisa Shiffman, M.D., Director of Maternal Fetal Medicine at Lincoln Medical & Mental Health Center in the Bronx, New York: “Research has shown that newborns recognize music they heard during the pregnancy.”

When can my baby start to hear me?

By about the fifth month of pregnancy, your baby’s ears are developed enough to listen to you, whether you’re chatting on the cell or talking with friends about your plans for the nursery. Baby will know your voice best because she’s tuning in from your belly! You might also notice that your little one gets particularly excited when her Daddy or another male relative talks. Science shows men’s deeper voices appeal because low-pitched sounds are easier to hear through the amniotic fluid. Pretty cool, right?

What exactly is my baby doing when she’s not moving?

Mulling over when she’ll make her big debut! OK, actually, most likely she’s sleeping. By 32 weeks, your unborn baby spends 90 to 95 percent of the day dozing (lucky kid!). Sometimes, she might be in a “quiet awake” state in which her body is still but her eyes are moving (think of a newborn quietly hanging out in his bouncy seat, observing the world around him). If it seems as though your unborn baby is moving less than usual, let your ob/gyn know.

Why does my baby seem ready to party when I’m ready to crash?

Unborn babies’ circadian rhythms—a fancy word for their sleep/wake cycle—are actually the opposite of yours. Their quiet time is in the morning and they shake and bake more as the day goes on. “Most women notice more movement when they’re resting simply because they’re paying attention to it,” notes Austin Chen, M.D., an ob/gyn at St. Luke’s Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. “A fetus can be just as active when you’re busy.” Hey, even if she’s keeping you up at night, it’s hard not to get a kick (literally!) out of your baby-to-be.

An article from the HUGGIES® Brand

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7 Tips For Documenting Your Pregnancy
When I was pregnant for the first time, I wanted to document every part of it! It was new, exciting and I really wanted to remember how I looked and felt each week. There are lots of different ways you can go about doing that but here are some tips that worked for me…
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The Forbidden Foods of Pregnancy
Pregnancy is such a strange time for a lot of us women. No matter if it’s our first or our fifth pregnancy, there’s always new ground to cover, uncharted territory to cross, new fears and new delights to be discovered. As I write this out, it sounds silly even to me, but the subject I always have the hardest time navigating through with each pregnancy is the ever dreaded and evolving list of foods to eat and stay away from. At each doctor’s appointment, when the nurse asks if I have any questions for the doctor, I inevitably always have a question about food. Here are some of the foods I eat with wild abandon, and the ones that I suspiciously stay away from.
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Delayed Physical Development
Your baby's physical development should follow fairly predictable patterns. If he's missing developmental milestones, make an appointment with his pediatrician to rule out autism, cerebral palsy and other serious conditions.
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My Baby is Crying
Jane Buckingham, Huggies Partner and Author of Modern Girl's Guide to Motherhood, gives advice on why your baby is crying including that it doesn't mean baby hates you.
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Changing Your Baby Diaper
Jane Buckingham, Huggies Partner and Author of Modern Girl's Guide to Motherhood, shares tips on where you can change your baby and what you need.
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Babies May Remember Words Heard Before Birth
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<span style="font-size: large;"><br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">From HealthDay</span><br><br>If you feel like talking to your fetus in the womb, a new study suggests you should: The research finds that babies develop a memory of words they hear frequently before they are born.

"We believe this shows how well the brain at this age adapts to sounds. It is a sign of very early language learning, or adaptation to the sounds they heard," said study co-author Minna Huotilainen, a docent at the University of Helsinki's Finnish Center of Excellence in Interdisciplinary Music Research.&nbsp;"A newborn baby is not an empty canvas, but has already learned how his or her mother and other family members speak."</span><div><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;">It may sound amazing that babies can recall sounds they heard in the womb, especially considering their brains are still developing the connections that allow them to process anything at all. Still, there are signs that fetuses actually remember sounds they encounter.&nbsp;
</span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;">"There is already some evidence that fetuses can learn, and that babies can remember songs or passages of speech from the fetal period," Huotilainen said.

The researchers tested the memory of Finnish fetuses by exposing them to a single word -- "tatata" -- that means nothing in the Finnish language.&nbsp;
</span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;">"It is a so-called 'pseudoword' that is important for research. It has three syllables, and we chose such a long word to make it challenging for the small brains to find the changes and give them something difficult to learn," Huotilainen said. "Such a word could exist in Finnish. It follows all the rules of the Finnish language." &nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;">From the 29th week of pregnancy until birth, about half of the 33 pregnant women in the study listened to recordings of the word repeated hundreds of times. Sometimes the recordings presented the word with a different middle syllable ("to") or pronounced differently.&nbsp;
</span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;">After birth, the researchers used scans to test the activity in the brains of all the babies when they heard the word. Those who'd heard it before "showed an enhanced reaction to this specific word," Huotilainen said. "They were able to process the word better, and also they were able to detect changes in the word better."&nbsp;
</span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;">Huotilainen said it appears that the type of learning revealed by the study probably happens in the late part of pregnancy, although this hasn't been studied. Babies begin to hear about halfway through pregnancy, she said.

Patricia Kuhl, a speech researcher and director of the University of Washington's NSF Science of Learning Center, praised the study. "The fact that learning from frequently presented sounds occurs while infants are still in the womb means that language learning does not begin on Day 1 at the moment of birth, but while the infant listens to sounds in utero. It's really quite amazing that the fetal brain has that capacity."&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;">What can parents do with this information?

"Be aware that the fetus can hear something from the outside world and learn from it," study co-author Huotilainen said. "Speak during your pregnancy. You can speak to other people or to your fetus if you like."

The study appears in this week's issue of the journal <em>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</em>.&nbsp;</span></div><div><span style="font-size: large;"><br><strong>More information</strong>

For more about <a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/pregnancy.html">pregnancy</a>, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.<br>&nbsp;<br>Copyright © 2013 <a href="http://www.healthday.com/">HealthDay</a>. All rights reserved.&nbsp;



<img src="http://pixel.newscred.com/px.gif?key=YXJ0aWNsZT0wYmNmMmQ2YjFlNWYxOGJhNDc3YTUyZDkzMmZjMzk0NiZub25jZT01N2U4MDFjZS04Nzg5LTRiOWMtYTBkYS1lOGM3YWM5ZDRhZGUmcHVibGlzaGVyPWVmOTYwNjg3Zjk3ODMwMmFlYzk1YTcwOWY2NTI1ZmNi" alt="" class="nc_pixel" height="1" width="1"/><br><br>Image: Getty Images</span><br></div>
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Fewer Moms Having C-Sections Before 39 Weeks
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<p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Moms can be convinced to change their minds about having their babies before they are at full term, according to a study released this week in the journal Obstetrics &amp; Gynecology. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">For years, medical groups have been encouraging moms to wait until their baby has remained in utero for 39 weeks. At the same time, the number of women choosing to induce labor or have an elective cesarean section for non-medical reasons has been rising. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Just last month, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists reiterated its recommendations, encouraging moms to avoid early elective deliveries. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">The study </span></font></span></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Twenty-five hospitals in California, New York, Florida, Illinois and Texas implemented what's called the Big 5 State Prematurity Initiative, a program that used a tool kit designed to help hospitals eliminate elective deliveries of babies before 39 weeks of gestation unless medically necessary. Thirty-eight percent of births in the United States occur in these five states. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">In just one year, there was a remarkable decrease. "These 25 hospitals overall saw an 83% drop in early-term deliveries," said Dr. Edward McCabe, a pediatrician and medical director for the March of Dimes Foundation, which developed the tool kit and partly funded the study. In January, nearly 28% of babies were born at 37 or 38 weeks, but by December, that number had dropped to 5%. There was a corresponding increase in births at 39 to 41 weeks, McCabe said. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">A cultural change has to occur for more hospitals to help mothers wait just a little longer, he said. With this tool kit, labor and delivery nurses were empowered to tell moms-to-be if there was a medical reason to deliver the baby before 39 weeks. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Why women deliver early </span></font></span></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Often it can be a matter of convenience. A doctor may be going out of town, and the mother may want to ensure that doctor delivers her baby. Or grandma and grandpa may be coming a little earlier than the due date. Some couples may even try to have their baby before the end of a year, so they can claim a tax credit. They may think that it's OK, because they've been told or have heard that 37 weeks of gestation is full term. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><span style="font-weight: bold;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What is full term? </span></font></span></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">"It wasn't until recently that we recognized that there are more complications and mortality at 37 weeks," McCabe said. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">"Important growth and development occur throughout pregnancy&nbsp; — all the way through the final few weeks," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "If the mother is healthy, current research indicates that delivery should not be scheduled before 39 weeks' gestation." </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">According to a 2007 CDC study, infant mortality risk for babies born at 37 or 38 weeks is 1.5 times higher than babies born at 39 to 41 weeks. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">"That's a 50% higher risk of infant mortality," McCabe said. Mortality at 39 to 41 weeks is very low, he said. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">In 2009, researchers showed that delivering a baby a week or two before 39 weeks, or even three or four days before that milestone is reached, can have a significant impact on the child's health. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">For one, babies need every extra day for their lungs to mature. McCabe said he hopes more hospitals will consider banning elective inductions and C-sections unless medically necessary. One way for this to change is to make it clearer what full term really is. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">"The nomenclature is changing," he said. "Thirty-seven and 38 weeks are now considered 'early term.' It's not yet official, but there is a movement toward calling 39 to 41 weeks full term. It's in the literature; people are using it." </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">It's hard to say exactly how many women choose to induce labor before 39 weeks. In 2008, 23% of babies were born because the mother's labor was induced, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. It's unclear, however, how often labor was induced before full term, as the data is gleaned from medical records that don't specify at what gestational age a baby is born. </span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Data from a 2006 report from the National Institutes of Health found an estimated 2.5% of all babies in the United States were delivered by C-section at the mother's request.</span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Source: CNN <br></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Image: 3pix Studio Associato di Garelli, Maccolini e Piana / Getty Images<br></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></p>
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Foods to Ease Pregnancy Symptoms
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<div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Yep, smart eating can make you feel better through all three trimesters. We look at common symptoms you may experience, from morning sickness to heartburn to insomnia, and come up with some foods to try.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><font style="font-weight: bold;">The Symptom: Morning Sickness</font></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What to eat: Ginger</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">When you're feeling queasy, ginger's your best friend. Brew ginger tea, chew candied ginger, snack on ginger snaps or sip ginger ale.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Hint: stirring the soda to get the bubbles out makes it easier on the stomach, says Suzanne Merrill-Nach, M.D., fellow at the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and an OB-GYN in private practice in San Diego. Don't like the taste of ginger? It's also available in capsule form (if you can stomach the idea of swallowing something whole).</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What else you can do:</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Let your aversions be your guide. You might naturally want to avoid strong smells and spicy foods. You can also experiment with the temperature of your food, said Melinda Johnson, registered dietician, director of the Didactic Program in Dietetics at Arizona State University and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. You may get relief from eating cold foods, such as gelatin or a smoothie. Other options that can be stomach settlers include raw veggies, cold sandwiches, lemon slices and, of course, crackers.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Know that nausea is more likely to happen on an empty stomach&nbsp;












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 hence the name morning sickness. If you tend to feel nauseous when you wake up, keep crackers by your bed to nibble on right away.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Also, eat sparingly but often. Consuming frequent, small meals is easier on your stomach than having three large ones a day. And don't worry too much: whatever you can tolerate is the right thing to eat, said Merrill-Nach.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">"If you're throwing up, it doesn't matter if it's not the perfectly well-balanced diet," she said.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><font style="font-weight: bold;">The Symptom: Constipation</font></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What to eat: Beans</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Beans, berries and broccoli will boost your fiber intake to keep things running smoothly. High-fiber breakfast cereals and oatmeal are also easy ways to ease this common pregnancy symptom.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What else you can do:</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Keep a glass or bottle of water with you and drink from it as much as you can. Hydration is important to keep your digestive system moving.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Moreover, Merrill-Nach said the calcium in prenatal vitamins can, um, stop you up. Ask your doctor to recommend a vitamin that contains a stool softener, which could get things going again.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><font style="font-weight: bold;">The Symptom: Heartburn</font></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What to eat: Bananas</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">In general, acidic foods bring on the burn, making low-acidic fruit, such as bananas and melons, a good choice to lessen heartburn symptoms. Avoiding acidic foods can help, but in pregnancy, it's not so much about trigger foods. In other words, you might sometimes be able to say that the chili you ate at lunch caused your heartburn, but in general, you can just chalk it up to being pregnant.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What else you can do:</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Pay attention to what you eat and when you eat it. You might want to skip spicy foods and not munch too close to bedtime. Also, don't lie down for at least an hour or so after eating a meal. If you do, Johnson recommends using lots of pillows to prop yourself up in a comfortable position and Merrill-Nach said to keep an antacid handy on your nightstand.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><font style="font-weight: bold;">The Symptom: Fatigue</font></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What to eat: Spinach</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">It's common to become iron-deficient or anemic in pregnancy, making you even more tired (if that's possible). If you've had pregnancies close together or if you follow a vegetarian diet, you can probably count yourself among that group, said Merrill-Nach. Vegetarians tend to have lower levels of vitamin B-12 and iron. Adding more iron-rich foods may help boost energy. That includes red meats, beans, leafy green vegetables like spinach and fortified breakfast cereals. Ask your doctor if you should also be taking an iron supplement.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What else you can do:</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">You might not realize it, but staying hydrated is key to keeping your energy level up.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">"When you're dehydrated, your blood becomes a bit sluggish moving through your body&nbsp;












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<span style="font-size: 12pt;">—</span>



 making you sluggish too," Johnson said.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Besides sipping water, you can eat soup, fruits and veggies to increase your fluid intake. But remember, you're pregnant: feeling tired is a given in the first trimester, no matter what you do. Rest as much as you can for now, and know that in the second trimester, you'll get back some of your energy.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><font style="font-weight: bold;">The Symptom: Sleeplessness</font></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What to drink: Warm milk</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">A cup of decaffeinated tea or warm milk (plain or flavored) before bed helps some moms-to-be drift off to dreamland, said Johnson. But skip the hot cocoa if you're sensitive to caffeine&nbsp;












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<span style="font-size: 12pt;">—</span>



 it has a small amount of it&nbsp;












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<span style="font-size: 12pt;">—</span>



 so you're better off sipping plain milk.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Caffeine, in general, should be limited in pregnancy to less than 200 milligrams (about the amount in a 12-ounce cup of coffee) per day. And avoiding it may help you get the z's you need.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">If you can't kick your caffeine habit completely, try not to drink it late in the day, when it's more likely to interfere with sleep.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">What else you can do:</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Supporting yourself with extra pillows at night can make you more comfortable and help you snooze better. You can use a big pregnancy body pillow or place a cushion between your knees to alleviate any back pain that may be keeping you up.</span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Source: TheBump.com<br></span></font></div><div><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Image: LuckyBusiness / Getty Images</span></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><br></div>
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0
Fetal Development: The First Trimester
<span style="font-size: large;"><img src="http://images.newscred.com/48cee7dcb94d2ba525ca81b0887466dd" height="333" width="333">

<br><br>
You're pregnant. Congratulations! You'll undoubtedly spend the months ahead wondering how your baby is growing and developing. What does your baby look like? How big is he or she? When will you feel the first kick?


Fetal development typically follows a predictable course. Find out what happens during the first trimester by checking out this weekly calendar of events. Keep in mind that measurements are approximate.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Weeks 1 and 2: Getting ready

</span><br><br>It might seem strange, but you're not actually pregnant the first week or two of the time allotted to your pregnancy. Yes, you read that correctly!


Conception typically occurs about two weeks after your last period begins. To calculate your due date, your health care provider will count ahead 40 weeks from the start of your last period. This means your period is counted as part of your pregnancy — even though you weren't pregnant at the time.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 3: Fertilization

</span><br><br>The sperm and egg unite in one of your fallopian tubes to form a one-celled entity called a zygote. If more than one egg is released and fertilized, you may have multiple zygotes.


The zygote has 46 chromosomes — 23 from you and 23 from the father. These chromosomes will help determine your baby's sex, traits such as eye and hair color, and, to some extent, personality and intelligence.


Soon after fertilization, the zygote travels down the fallopian tube toward the uterus. At the same time, it will begin dividing rapidly to form a cluster of cells resembling a tiny raspberry. The inner group of cells will become the embryo. The outer group of cells will become the membranes that nourish and protect it.


During fertilization, the sperm and egg unite in one of the fallopian tubes to form a zygote. Then the zygote travels down the fallopian tube, where it becomes a morula. Once it reaches the uterus, the morula becomes a blastocyst. The blastocyst then burrows into the uterine wall — a process called implantation.
<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 4: Implantation

</span><br><br>By the time it reaches the uterus, the rapidly dividing ball of cells — now known as a blastocyst — has separated into two sections.


The inner group of cells will become the embryo. The outer group will become the cells that nourish and protect it. On contact, it will burrow into the uterine wall for nourishment. This process is called implantation.


The placenta, which will nourish your baby throughout the pregnancy, also begins to form.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 5: The embryonic period begins

</span><br><br>The fifth week of pregnancy, or the third week after conception, marks the beginning of the embryonic period. This is when the baby's brain, spinal cord, heart and other organs begin to form.


The embryo is now made of three layers. The top layer — the ectoderm — will give rise to your baby's outermost layer of skin, central and peripheral nervous systems, eyes, inner ear, and many connective tissues.


Your baby's heart and a primitive circulatory system will form in the middle layer of cells — the mesoderm. This layer of cells will also serve as the foundation for your baby's bones, muscles, kidneys and much of the reproductive system.


The inner layer of cells — the endoderm — will become a simple tube lined with mucous membranes. Your baby's lungs, intestines and bladder will develop here.


By the end of this week, your baby is likely about the size of the tip of a pen.


By the end of the fifth week of pregnancy — three weeks after conception — your baby is about the size of the tip of a pen.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 6: The neural tube closes

</span><br><br>Growth is rapid this week. Just four weeks after conception, the neural tube along your baby's back is closing and your baby's heart is pumping blood.


Basic facial features will begin to appear, including passageways that will make up the inner ear and arches that will contribute to the jaw. Your baby's body begins to take on a C-shaped curvature. Small buds will soon become arms and legs.


By the end of the sixth week of pregnancy — four weeks after conception — your baby's heart is pumping blood.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 7: Baby's head develops
</span><br><br>Seven weeks into your pregnancy, or five weeks after conception, your baby's brain and face are rapidly developing. Tiny nostrils become visible, and the eye lenses begin to form. The arm buds that sprouted last week now take on the shape of paddles.


By the end of this week, your baby might be a little bigger than the top of a pencil eraser.


By the end of the seventh week of pregnancy — five weeks after conception — your baby might be a little bigger than the top of a pencil eraser.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 8: Baby's eyes are visible

</span><br><br>Eight weeks into your pregnancy, or six weeks after conception, your baby's arms and legs are growing longer, and fingers have begun to form. The shell-shaped parts of your baby's ears also are forming, and your baby's eyes are visible. The upper lip and nose have formed. The trunk of your baby's body is beginning to straighten.


By the end of this week, your baby might be about 1/2 inch (13 millimeters) long.


By the end of the eighth week of pregnancy — six weeks after conception — your baby might be about 1/2 inch (11 to 14 millimeters) long.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 9: Baby's toes form
</span><br><br>In the ninth week of pregnancy, or seven weeks after conception, your baby's arms grow, develop bones and bend at the elbows. Toes form, and your baby's eyelids and ears continue developing.


By the end of this week, your baby might be about 3/4 inch (20 millimeters) long.


By the end of the ninth week of pregnancy — seven weeks after conception — your baby's arms bend at the elbows.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 10: Baby's neck begins to develop

</span><br><br>By the 10th week of pregnancy, or eight weeks after conception, your baby's head has become more round. The neck begins to develop, and your baby's eyelids begin to close to protect his or her developing eyes.


By the end of the 10th week of pregnancy — eight weeks after conception — your baby's eyelids begin to close.

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 11: Baby's genitals develop

</span><br><br>At the beginning of the 11th week of pregnancy, or the ninth week after conception, your baby's head still makes up about half of its length. However, your baby's body is about to catch up, growing rapidly in the coming weeks.


Your baby is now officially described as a fetus. This week your baby's eyes are widely separated, the eyelids fused and the ears low set. Red blood cells are beginning to form in your baby's liver. By the end of this week, your baby's external genitalia will start developing into a penis or clitoris and labia majora.


By now your baby might measure about 2 inches (50 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh almost 1/3 ounce (8 grams).

<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 12: Baby's fingernails develop

<br></span><br>Twelve weeks into your pregnancy, or 10 weeks after conception, your baby is developing fingernails. Your baby's face now has a human profile.


By now your baby might be about 2 1/2 inches (60 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh about 1/2 ounce (14 grams).


By the end of the 12th week of pregnancy — 10 weeks after conception — your baby might weigh about 1/2 ounce (14 grams).


<br><br>©1998-2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved.Terms of Use.

<br><br>Source: Mayo Clinic<br>Image: Mayo Clinic<br></span><br>
0
Exercise During Pregnancy May Boost Babies' Brain Power, Study Shows
<span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana"><img src="http://images.newscred.com/072bd1266f35e3ecac8cb3350067d679" width="500" height="333"></font>

</span><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;">There's new evidence that women shouldn't trade in their running shoes or yoga mats for a pair of slippers and a remote control when they get pregnant. A small new study has found that exercising for just 20 minutes, three times per week, may help boost newborns' brain activity.</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Researchers with the University of Montreal assigned a small group of women who were entering their second trimester to two different groups: Women in one group got at least 20 minutes of moderate cardiovascular exercise three times a week, while women in the other group did not exercise at all.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Between eight and 12 days after the babies were born, electrical activity along their scalps was recorded using electroencephalography, or an EEG. The researchers placed 124 electrodes on the babies' heads to measure their responses to different sounds. The babies whose moms were in the exercise group appeared to be better at processing the sounds, which, the researchers argue, could have implications for their overall brain development.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">"Our results show that the babies born from the mothers who were physically active have a more mature cerebral activation, suggesting that their brains developed more rapidly," study researcher Élise Labonté-LeMoyne, a Ph.D. candidate in kinesiology at the University of Montreal, said in a statement.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">The group presented its findings at the Society for Neuroscience's annual meeting in San Diego this week.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that pregnant women who have no medical or obstetric complications get at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise on most, if not all, days of the week. Exercise has been shown to help women with the aches and pains associated with pregnancy (such as backaches, constipation and bloating) and to help prevent and treat gestational diabetes,according to ACOG.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">"Moderate exercise helps create a healthy fetal environment," said Dr. David Mendez, a neonatologist with Miami Children's Hospital, adding that exercise might explain the differences in babies' brain activity. (Mendez did not work on the new study, but had reviewed it.)</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Still, Mendez cautioned against reading too much into the results. "It's an interesting finding, but it's only going to be backed-up by long-term neuro-developmental studies that show these benefits last ... and even that would be difficult scientifically, because there are a whole host of influences on a baby's brain once [he or she] is born," he said.&nbsp;</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Indeed, the researchers are just now in the process of tracking babies' cognitive and language development, as well as their motor skills, one year after birth to see if there are still differences in brain activity.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">"Great parenting," Mendez added, "is never going to be replaced by exercise during pregnancy."</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">Article:&nbsp;</font><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Huffington Post</span></span></div><div><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Image: seenad / Getty Images</font></div>
0
Fetal Development: The Second Trimester
<span style="font-size: large;"><img src="http://images.newscred.com/b41e4c202d20ff1b179b34a8b1658067" height="333" width="500">

<br><br>As your pregnancy progresses, your baby might begin to seem more real. You might hear the heartbeat at your prenatal appointments, and your enlarging abdomen might force you to put away your favorite jeans.<br><br>While you're adjusting to the changes in your body, fetal development takes on new meaning. Two months ago, your baby was simply a cluster of cells. Now he or she has functioning organs, nerves and muscles. Find out what happens during the second trimester by checking out this weekly calendar of events. Keep in mind that measurements are approximate.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 13: Urine forms<br></span><br>Thirteen weeks into your pregnancy, or 11 weeks after conception, your baby's intestines have returned to his or her abdomen from the umbilical cord <span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">—</span><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;"></span>



 where they've been growing for the past couple of weeks. Your baby is also beginning to form urine and discharge it into the amniotic fluid.<br><br>Tissue that will become bone is also developing around your baby's head and within his or her arms and legs.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 14: Baby's sex becomes apparent</span><br><br>Fourteen weeks into your pregnancy, or 12 weeks after conception, your baby's arms have almost reached the final relative lengths they'll be at birth and your baby's neck has become more defined. Red blood cells are forming in your baby's spleen.<br><br>Your baby's sex will become apparent this week or in the coming weeks. For girls, ovarian follicles begin forming. For boys, the prostate appears.<br><br>By now your baby might be almost 3 1/2 inches (90 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh about 1 1/2 ounces (40 grams).<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 15: Baby's skeleton develops bones<br></span><br>Fifteen weeks into your pregnancy, or 13 weeks after conception, your baby is growing rapidly. Your baby's skeleton is developing bones, which will become visible on ultrasound images in a few weeks. Your baby's scalp hair pattern also is forming.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 16: Baby can make sucking motions</span><br><br>Sixteen weeks into your pregnancy, or 14 weeks after conception, your baby's eyes have begun to face forward and slowly move. The ears are close to reaching their final position. Your baby might be able to make sucking motions with his or her mouth.<br><br>Your baby's movements are becoming coordinated and can be detected during ultrasound exams.<br><br>By now your baby might be more than 4 1/2 inches (120 millimeters) long from crown to rump.<br><br>By the end of the 16th week of pregnancy&nbsp;












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<span style="font-family: Cambria;">—</span>



 14 weeks after conception <span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">— </span><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;"></span>your baby might be able to make sucking motions with his or her mouth.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 17: Fat accumulates</span><br><br>Seventeen weeks into your pregnancy, or 15 weeks after conception, fat stores begin to develop under your baby's skin. The fat will provide energy and help keep your baby warm after birth.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 18: Baby begins to hear</span><br><br>Eighteen weeks into your pregnancy, or 16 weeks after conception, your baby's ears begin to stand out on the sides of his or her head. Your baby might begin to hear.<br><br>By now your baby might be 5 1/2 inches (140 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh 7 ounces (200 grams).<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 19: Baby's uterus forms</span><br><br>Nineteen weeks into your pregnancy, or 17 weeks after conception, a greasy, cheese-like coating called <span style="font-style: italic;">vernix caseosa</span> begins to cover your baby. The vernix caseosa helps protect your baby's delicate skin from abrasions, chapping and hardening that can result from exposure to amniotic fluid.<br><br>For girls, the uterus and vagina might begin to form this week.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 20: The halfway point</span><br><br>Halfway into your pregnancy, or 18 weeks after conception, you might be able to feel your baby's first movements, also known as quickening. If you've been pregnant before, you might have begun feeling your baby's movements a few weeks ago.<br><br>By now your baby might be about 6 1/3 inches (160 millimeters) long from crown to rump.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 21: Baby can swallow</span><br><br>Twenty-one weeks into your pregnancy, or 19 weeks after conception, your baby is poised to gain more weight. By this week your baby is becoming more active and is able to swallow.<br><br>By the end of the 21st week of pregnancy&nbsp;












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<span style="font-family: Cambria;">—</span>



 19 weeks after conception <style><!--
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<span style="font-family: Cambria;">—</span> your baby might be able to swallow.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 22: Baby's hair becomes visible</span><br><br>Twenty-two weeks into your pregnancy, or 20 weeks after conception, your baby is completely covered with a fine, down-like hair called <span style="font-style: italic;">lanugo</span>. The lanugo helps hold the vernix caseosa on the skin. Your baby's eyebrows might be visible.<br><br>By now your baby might be 7 1/2 inches (190 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh 1 pound (460 grams).<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 23: Fingerprints and footprints form</span><br><br>Twenty-three weeks into your pregnancy, or 21 weeks after conception, your baby's skin is wrinkled, more translucent than before and pink to red in color.<br><br>This week your baby begins to have rapid eye movements. Your baby's tongue will soon develop taste buds. Fingerprints and footprints are forming. For boys, the testes are descending from the abdomen. For girls, the uterus and ovaries are in place <style><!--
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<span style="font-family: Cambria;">—</span> complete with a lifetime supply of eggs.<br><br>With intensive medical care, some babies born this week might be able to survive.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 24: Real hair grows</span><br><br>Twenty-four weeks into your pregnancy, or 22 weeks after conception, your baby is regularly sleeping and waking. Real hair is growing on his or her head.<br><br>By now your baby might be about 8 inches (210 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh more than 1 1/3 pounds (630 grams).<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 25: Baby responds to your voice</span><br><br>Twenty-five weeks into your pregnancy, or 23 weeks after conception, your baby's hands and startle reflex are developing. Your baby might be able to respond to familiar sounds, such as your voice, with movement.<br><br>By the end of the 25th week of pregnancy <span style="font-family: Cambria;">—</span> 23 weeks after conception <span style="font-family: Cambria;">—</span> your baby might be able to respond to your voice or other familiar sounds with movement.<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 26: Baby's fingernails develop</span><br><br>Twenty-six weeks into your pregnancy, or 24 weeks after conception, your baby has fingernails.<br><br>Your baby's lungs are beginning to produce surfactant, the substance that allows the air sacs in the lungs to inflate <span style="font-family: Cambria;">—</span>



 and keeps them from collapsing and sticking together when they deflate.<br><br>By now your baby might be 9 inches (230 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh nearly 2 pounds (820 grams).<br><br><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 27: Second trimester ends</span><br><br>This week marks the end of the second trimester. At 27 weeks, or 25 weeks after conception, your baby's lungs and nervous system are continuing to mature&nbsp;












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<span style="font-family: Cambria;">—</span>



 and he or she has likely been growing like a weed. Your baby's crown-to-rump length might have tripled since the 12-week mark.<br><br>












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</span><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">© 1998-2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved.Terms of Use.</span><br></span></p><span style="font-size: large;"><br>Source: Mayo Clinic<br>Image: Aleksandar Jocic / Getty Images<br></span><br>
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Fetal Development: The Third Trimester

<span style="font-size: large;"><img src="http://images.newscred.com/f0e421a3818303acc82d719c972418e7" height="333" width="300">

</span><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana"><br>The end of your pregnancy is near! By now, you might be tired of being pregnant</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">—</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;"> and eager to meet your baby face to face. Your uterus, however, is still a busy place. Understand how fetal development continues as you approach your due date. Here's a weekly calendar of events for the third trimester. Keep in mind that measurements are approximate.</span></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Week 28: Baby'</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">s eyes </span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">open</span></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Twenty</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">-eight weeks into your pregnancy, or 26 weeks after conception, your baby's eyelids are partially open and eyelashes have formed. Your baby is gaining weight, which is smoothing out many of the wrinkles in his or her skin.</span></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">By now your baby might be nearly 10 inches (250 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh nearly 2 1/4 pounds (1,000 grams). Otherwise healthy babies born this week <span id="f4701796-c391-46dd-817d-7e88477c9794" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="085629ac-735b-4341-8c62-b8d1d56249b9" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="5423a682-ea64-4852-88e9-42d815f3fe8b" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="878e823e-05af-4b9d-a4ce-8b05f8165d30" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">have</span></span> a 90 percent chance of survival without physical or neurological impairment&nbsp;</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;—</span><font face="Arial, Verdana">&nbsp;and the odds improve with each passing week.</font></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 29: Baby's bones are fully developed</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">Twenty-nine weeks into your pregnancy, or 27 weeks after conception, your baby's bones are fully developed, but they're still soft and pliable.&nbsp;</font><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">By the end of the 29th week of pregnancy</span><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">—</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">&nbsp;27 weeks after conception</span><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">—</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">&nbsp;your baby's bones are fully developed.</span></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">Week 30: Baby's eyes are wide </span><span style="font-weight: bold;">open</span></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;">Thirty weeks into your pregnancy, or 28 weeks after conception, your baby's eyes are wide open a good part of the time. Your baby might have a good head of hair by this week. Red blood cells are now forming in your baby's bone marrow.</span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">By now your baby might be more than 10 1/2 inches (270 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh nearly 3 pounds (1,300 grams).</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 31: Sexual development continues</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Thirty-one weeks into your pregnancy, or 29 weeks after conception, your baby's central nervous system has matured to the stage where it can control body temperature.</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 32: Baby practices breathing</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Thirty-two weeks into your pregnancy, or 30 weeks after conception, your baby's toenails are visible.</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">Although your baby's lungs aren't fully formed, he or she practices breathing. Your baby's body begins absorbing vital minerals, such as iron and calcium from the intestinal tract. The layer of soft, downy hair that has covered your baby's skin for the past few months&nbsp;</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;— </span><font face="Arial, Verdana">known as <span id="283b81e5-8543-4d9d-8f64-66326d75da05" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="5a0952dd-9f56-4f0b-a1c9-4ca54bddb3d5" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="83fa3614-e472-4092-a093-ce1f01cd5f1a" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="33627c25-7d65-427c-8634-7b2684042cb5" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">lanugo</span></span> </font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">—</span><font face="Arial, Verdana">&nbsp;starts to fall off this week.</font></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">By now your baby might be 11 inches (280 millimeters) long from crown to rump and weigh 3 3/4 pounds (1,700 grams).</span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 33: Baby detects light</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">Thirty-three weeks into your pregnancy, or 31 weeks after conception, your baby's pupils can constrict, <span id="c8dac90b-88fc-4569-8c61-5d0d94ddff08" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="52b1b197-c4ee-4274-9db0-9112261d2a40" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="2f06c01f-8b8a-4c4c-bdfd-7c07948215b3" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="f2535db8-5798-488a-95de-2ec7e67d014e" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">dilate</span></span> and detect light entering his or her eyes<span id="28974f36-e449-4ab0-8945-ab0d2925aa84" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="52b1b197-c4ee-4274-9db0-9112261d2a40" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="2d2bd3cf-aaba-4b9f-a557-6596f10366b1" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="f2535db8-5798-488a-95de-2ec7e67d014e" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.</span></span></font>By the end of the 33rd week of pregnancy<span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;—</span>&nbsp;31 weeks after conception <span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">— </span>your baby's eyes can detect light.</span></div><div><span style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;">Week 34: Baby's fingernails grow</span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">Thirty-four weeks into your pregnancy, or 32 weeks after conception, your baby's fingernails have reached his or her fingertips.</span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">By now your baby might be nearly 12 inches (300 millimeters) long from crown to rump. The pasty white coating that protects your baby's skin</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;—</span><font face="Arial, Verdana">&nbsp;the vernix caseosa&nbsp;</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;— </span><font face="Arial, Verdana">is about to get thicker.</font></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 35: Protective coating thickens</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">Thirty-five weeks into your pregnancy, or 33 weeks after conception, your baby's limbs are becoming chubby. Your baby is gaining weight rapidly </font><font face="Arial, Verdana"><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">—</span> about 1/2 pound (230 grams) a week for the next month.</font></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 36: Rapid weight gain begins</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">Thirty-six weeks into your pregnancy, or 34 weeks after conception, the crowded conditions <span id="9f5e5b1f-b07d-4cd3-a77a-5e514274564c" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="7cc1d1ea-6ed5-4d5b-bf2e-013da7a21940" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="6fb4d9eb-bdef-4624-ba42-762137db8c96" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="74474322-06c4-4d5f-9db0-b34e178656b9" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">inside</span></span> your uterus might make it harder for your baby to give you a punch. However, you'll probably still feel lots of stretches, rolls and wiggles. You might want to check on your baby's movements from time to time (<span id="5cca2edf-6b59-4c4b-9e3a-f69f87b06b68" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e76bc57b-701b-4ac5-90b1-cbbe308c88c6" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="c46ae247-62ce-44af-935a-db191ca3c8b6" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="ad33ca9f-debc-4fb8-a889-1ed619d48273" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">kick</span></span> count)&nbsp;</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;—</span><font face="Arial, Verdana">&nbsp;especially if you think you've noticed decreased activity. Ask your health care provider how many movements you should detect in a certain number of hours.</font></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 37: Baby is full term</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Thirty-seven weeks into your pregnancy, or 35 weeks after conception, your baby will be considered full term. Your baby's organs are ready to function on their own.</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">To prepare for birth, your baby's head might start descending into your pelvis. If your baby is<span id="b8242f22-70c4-4ff1-9434-993111059165" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="0c2f4ce6-6089-4e27-8f36-775e562bb4e9" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">n'</span>t head down, your health care provider will talk to you about ways to deal with this <span id="450241bb-8f29-489e-a80e-03b7ab88ebd1" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="0c2f4ce6-6089-4e27-8f36-775e562bb4e9" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">i</span>ssue.</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 38: Baby develops a <span id="b73eb141-bc30-4203-bc6c-d692b4172d58" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="0c2f4ce6-6089-4e27-8f36-775e562bb4e9" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">firm </span><span id="b73eb141-bc30-4203-bc6c-d692b4172d58" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="0c2f4ce6-6089-4e27-8f36-775e562bb4e9" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">grasp</span></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><span ginger_software_uiphraseguid="0c2f4ce6-6089-4e27-8f36-775e562bb4e9" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">T</span>hirty-eight weeks into your pregnancy, or 36 weeks after conception, your baby is developing a firm grasp.</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">Your baby's toenails have reached the tips of his or her toes. His or her brain might weigh about 14 ounces (400 grams). After birth, your bab<span id="2c196884-40a2-4b09-824c-8bab24574505" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="95bd0ad8-87e1-43e3-a695-b166d1563a73" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">y'</span>s brain will continue to grow. Your baby has mostly shed all of his or<span id="62850aa6-1521-423d-b888-15df55424975" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e60450c9-7bdc-4ce0-b9d2-57dd9851c5d0" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"> her </span><span id="e2a2403a-0a72-417e-8d12-31f8b7f38d2b" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="cab30d8c-869d-425b-81ec-fa666c9716be" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="62850aa6-1521-423d-b888-15df55424975" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e60450c9-7bdc-4ce0-b9d2-57dd9851c5d0" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">l</span>anugo</span>.</span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">By now your baby might weigh about 6 1/2 pounds (2,900 g<span id="d6c1b239-3c2f-4561-acbe-56d9efaeac4d" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e9584414-9cff-4cc2-a2f8-bd278395c9e1" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">r</span>ams).</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 39: Placenta prov<span id="2ccc0ab9-45e3-4a3c-bc1a-bfba380aff92" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e9584414-9cff-4cc2-a2f8-bd278395c9e1" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">ides </span><span id="2ccc0ab9-45e3-4a3c-bc1a-bfba380aff92" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e9584414-9cff-4cc2-a2f8-bd278395c9e1" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">antibodies</span></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><span ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e9584414-9cff-4cc2-a2f8-bd278395c9e1" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">T</span>hirty-nine weeks into your pregnancy, or 37 weeks after conception, your bab<span id="91e23b45-2c0d-474c-bede-ecc0a8de42d2" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e9584414-9cff-4cc2-a2f8-bd278395c9e1" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">y'</span>s chest is becoming more prominent. For boys, the testes continue to descend into the scrotum.</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">The placenta continues to supply your baby with antibodies that will help fight infection after birth. If you breast-feed your baby, your milk will provide additional antib<span id="902277eb-5921-4bc2-a2b1-d4cb9bccbc5e" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="5271c0a2-dbe8-425e-b217-0d1d980ddddb" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">o</span>dies.</font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana"><br></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Week 40: Your due <span id="45d9aaaa-8126-499c-ba58-09a24c38e5fc" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="5271c0a2-dbe8-425e-b217-0d1d980ddddb" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">date </span><span id="45d9aaaa-8126-499c-ba58-09a24c38e5fc" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="5271c0a2-dbe8-425e-b217-0d1d980ddddb" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">arrives</span></font></div><div><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Forty weeks into your pregnancy, or 38 weeks after conception, your baby might be about 18 to 20 inches (450 to 500 millimeters) long and weigh 6 1/2 pounds (2,900 grams) or more. Remember, however, that healthy babies come in different sizes.</font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">Do<span id="ebf957e9-ba97-4892-9f33-15c9f9cea2b0" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="a94984f5-88ba-4019-b2a1-ee023c6d3683" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">n'</span>t be alarmed if your due date comes and goes without incident. I<span id="33046c66-bfe7-420d-9dd6-cd36e061f36a" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="9a819d80-0764-4a64-b0d9-deba231de952" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">t'</span>s just as normal to deliver a baby a week or two late&nbsp;</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;—</span><font face="Arial, Verdana"> or early&nbsp;</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;—</span><font face="Arial, Verdana"> as it is to deliver on your due date.</font></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">By the end of the 40th week of pregnancy</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;—</span><font face="Arial, Verdana">&nbsp;38 weeks after conception&nbsp;</font><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 22px;">&nbsp;—</span><font face="Arial, Verdana">&nbsp;your baby might weight 6 to 9 pounds (2,720 to 4,080 grams).</font></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">












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</font><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: large;">©<font face="Arial, Verdana"> 1998-2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights res<span id="744d8452-d82a-4a77-90cd-d0b2b459aa55" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="37d33a9b-6e0c-4bf4-bcb2-f77cc53f56be" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">e</span>rved<span id="21632950-8266-4ff6-a8d7-eef919a7f077" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="f9de977e-c6fa-4023-8512-07df0934429f" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="f2c2a1e9-d7e3-4a61-9347-4c503ef16627" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="5c021aa7-0e92-4741-8b5d-45c5792f2128" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.</span></span>Terms of Use.</font></span></p></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">Source: Mayo Clinic<br>Image: Mayo Clinic<br></span></div><div style="font-size: 10pt; font-weight: normal;"><br></div>
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Overdue Pregnancy: What to Do When Baby's Overdue
<span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana"><img src="http://images.newscred.com/a4c21ecd65f54a064d7b898f5fc377b8" height="333" width="500"></font>

</span><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br><br>Your due date has come and gone — and you're still pregnant. What's going on?</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">Although your due date might seem to have magical qualities, it's simply an educated guess about when your baby is most likely to arrive. It's perfectly normal to give birth one to two weeks before — or after — your due date. In fact, your pregnancy must continue two weeks past your due date to earn the official label of overdue pregnancy, also known as post term pregnancy<span id="3ab44f1d-f688-4eb2-95e0-2ede4694efe8" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="6b6223c3-6bd8-46bc-bae9-a76f962eb3f4" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="0d5763a4-d857-42ef-9f4f-4e9fcb0d38f4" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="dbdd4ca7-d244-4171-bf28-fc8d788958fe" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.&nbsp;</span></span>Enough already<span id="c505088b-085f-4f10-a7c0-98213c17a734" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="6b6223c3-6bd8-46bc-bae9-a76f962eb3f4" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="305af7c6-c46d-471c-9581-ac3112f7a77e" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="dbdd4ca7-d244-4171-bf28-fc8d788958fe" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">!&nbsp;</span></span>You might be more likely to have an overdue pregnancy if:</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">- The exact date of the start of your last menstrual period isn't </span><span style="font-size: large;">known</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">- This</span><span style="font-size: large;"> is your first pregnancy</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">- You've had prior overdue pregnancies</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">- Overdue pregnancy runs in your family</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">- Your baby is a boy</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">- You're obese</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">Rarely, overdue pregnancy might be related to problems with the placenta or the baby.</span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Whatever the cause, you're probably tired of being pregnant by this point. Your back might ache and your ankles might be swollen. You might be struggling with heartburn and hemorrhoids. You might have trouble sleeping because you simply can't get comfortable — or anxiety about childbirth might keep you awake.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Rest assured, an overdue pregnancy won't last forever. Labor could begin at any time.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Keeping an eye on your pregnancy</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Prenatal care will continue after you pass your due date. Your health care provider will watch for signs of complications, such as <span id="cc383886-0f94-4da2-bfd5-c7e1c725d91b" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="c90ea552-8d8b-488b-9f77-92302228ca1e" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="7fea587c-cdd2-4b7f-8035-4fe95e60133a" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="90b3174e-17f6-4ffb-a4b3-033ce858a0a8" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">preeclampsia</span></span>. He or she will also check your cervix to see if it's begun to thin and dilate in preparation for labor. If you're more than one week past your due date, your health care provider might track your baby's heartbeat with an electronic fetal monitor or use ultrasound to observe your baby's movements and measure the amount of amniotic fluid.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Giving baby a nudge</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Sometimes it's better to deliver sooner rather than later — particularly if your pregnancy continues one to two weeks past your due date or your health care provider is concerned about your health or your baby's health. If your baby is overdue, his or her size might complicate a vaginal delivery. In addition, the amount of amniotic fluid might begin to decrease as the baby grows, which can cause the umbilical cord to become pinched as the baby moves or your uterus contracts. In a few cases, aging of the placenta might compromise the baby's ability to thrive in your uterus. An overdue baby is also more likely to inhale fecal waste (<span id="a4dacc32-567c-45cd-a9a5-0472639ba5e5" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="caa6d918-61ab-43d1-bd6b-2d25cb42da7e" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="3ad8c99f-3d10-4284-8a28-2b6b875a5692" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="ccd8bdc1-0c13-45f4-b595-4c8b17ded3ba" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">meconium</span></span>), which can cause breathing problems or an infection after birth.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">If you and your health care provider decide to induce your labor, you might be given medication to help your cervix soften and open. If your amniotic sac is still intact, your health care provider might break your water by creating an opening with a thin plastic hook. You might feel a warm gush of fluid when the sac breaks open.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">If necessary, you might also be given medication to kick-start your contractions. A common choice is Pitocin, a synthetic version of oxytocin — a hormone that causes the uterus to contract. The dosage might be adjusted to regulate the strength and frequency of your contractions.</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font style="font-weight: bold; font-size: large;" face="Arial, Verdana">Hang in there</font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;"><br></font></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><font face="Arial, Verdana">You're in the <span id="74c9b8c9-b677-4a09-84f8-aa918417041d" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="155dfa39-e2b2-4434-95ff-848cc950e14f" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="4d7d51c1-6670-455c-bb57-6cae72f1aaba" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="0c1412b0-9a45-49a2-b1d1-e1010cb44682" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">homestretch</span></span>! Whether your health care provider suggests a wait-and-see approach or schedules an induction, do your best to enjoy the rest of your pregnancy</font><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">.</span></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-weight: bold;">Accept your emotions<span id="c74afe29-5691-4676-b1cd-99b93a93a4f2" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="cc9a4081-3bc1-4e0a-b327-e986bc2227ba" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="34dbc87b-8d67-4291-aa65-749f9fd3fd8c" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="8e290846-988f-454e-a488-c3a3c74c3dbb" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.&nbsp;</span></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">It's OK to feel frustrated or disappointed. You probably didn't bargain for more than 40 weeks of pregnancy</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">.</span></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Take advantage of the extra time</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;"><span id="d9b9f98f-51a5-48aa-97cc-d1d4e3ce8135" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="b35457fd-c068-42d1-9f15-e0023fb878ca" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="4e801dc8-4db1-4384-81ee-ccf2811ae800" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="fe1a1f3d-b4d1-4169-820d-8c381f0a06ef" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Sleep while you can. Put the finishing touches on the nursery. Stock your freezer with extra meals.</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">&nbsp;Address birth announcements and thank-you cards</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">.</span></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Make plans</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;"><span id="870397f6-3551-4220-925a-7961ee521551" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="ad88fe09-839c-4d93-b581-2caa23193f20" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="0aa410ca-fbe3-4bea-9e38-a02a9dbd3006" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="ef2a480d-a4cc-4b21-93a8-8c244ffd909b" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Your health care provider might want you to stay close to home, but that's no reason to miss a new movie, go out to dinner or take a walk in the park. Don't be afraid to make plans just because you might need to cancel at the last minute</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">.</span></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-weight: bold; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-weight: bold;">Put your voice mail and social media accounts to work</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;"><span id="e897ea9a-51f9-44ef-abcc-9344d1ccd360" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="eb451171-58b5-4456-b05b-a2d14802b707" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="20d56f59-2869-4ec3-951f-fc31885eba8a" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="4090cabf-df89-4706-940e-1c955cd63c32" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.&nbsp;</span></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">To keep well-meaning friends and loved ones informed, consider recording a voice mail greeting with the latest on the pregnancy front or updating your social media accounts accordingly. "We're patiently waiting for the big day!" might be enough to handle the inquiries that are sure to test your patience</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">.</span></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-weight: bold; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Treat home remedies with a dose of caution</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;"><span id="79bc226f-707e-4588-88b9-c43af9935853" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="7d59f27c-9118-4245-925d-b735a9dae402" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="8c54a819-027f-4447-ba14-62566fbc4506" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="fbfca721-13fd-4afe-a409-d16631e7222c" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">A simple Internet search will yield countless results for "natural" ways to trigger labor, such as eating spicy food or having sex. Some tactics are relaxing, others silly — and a few might do more harm than good.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Get your health care provider's OK before trying any home remedies, herbal supplements or alternative treatments</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">.</span></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-weight: bold;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Stay in touch with your health care provider</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;"><span id="0ab0654d-e831-4db0-b69d-2307a03892d4" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="2e28ecc6-4531-48ad-9da2-4eda620f7101" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="0e5441e2-51cb-42db-94d5-edb26ae63956" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="ea28c99f-fc5f-41f9-9e5f-a399bfd0c6ae" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">You'll need frequent checkups until your baby is born. Make sure you know what to do if you think you're in labor</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;"><span id="abf80be4-c406-483d-a66b-3f479759b03b" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="4a1853e8-6c3b-46fa-ba21-8ec392ac33d1" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark"><span id="8f2f9e13-169f-496e-8bfa-69050f7b6650" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="e503ad66-a0ec-4c4c-92dd-43d78daecaa0" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.</span></span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Soon you'll hold your baby in your arms — and the long wait won't matter</span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">.</span></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">©1998-2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved</span><span id="15760d8f-03e4-4039-bc30-38c253abe593" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="38daf6f2-d0d1-4ef3-8777-ebfac6892909" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark" style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;"><span id="ccd43232-efc8-4eba-a9ae-34809e21c55f" ginger_software_uiphraseguid="b073b2e2-128d-4d7b-8fdb-7ffb498e8349" class="GINGER_SOFTWARE_mark">.</span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana;">Terms of Use.</span></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-size: large;"><br></span></div><div style="font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: large;">Source: Mayo Clinic</span></div><div><font face="Arial, Verdana" style="font-size: large;">Image:&nbsp;Ma-Ke / Getty Images</font></div><div style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial, Verdana; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><br></span></div>
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