Category: Preparing the Nursery
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42 results
An Organized Nursery? Sure!

If you're expecting for the first time, you may be wondering how one tiny infant can require so much stuff! We've got some ideas that might help.

Sure, things are bound to get a little messy (okay, very messy) once your little one arrives, but if you have items in place to help keep the nursery in order, clean—up time will be a breeze, which amounts to more quality time with baby.

Organize the closet

It begins with organization and making good use of all the space in your nursery. There are many great products available that are functional pieces for the nursery and also provide extra storage space.

Take a look at the functionality of the baby's future closet. You want to make sure you can utilize the entire space, no matter how big or small. Are there plenty of hanging racks, shelves and even drawers? If not, there are many closet storage additions available at places like Target, Home Depot and Lowe's that you can add into your existing closet space without a total renovation. ClosetMaid makes some affordable pieces that you can install yourself or simply fit into and around your existing closet layout.

Finding storage space

Let's face it: The crib takes up a lot of room in the nursery. But it also comes with a perk — hidden storage space underneath. Jessica Stone, mom to three-month-old Tyler, swears by her crib trundle, which slides underneath the crib. It is ideal for storing extra items that you don't use every day. You can even just use some plastic storage bins, such as those sold by Rubbermaid, in How To Buy Newborn Clothes which to store some non-essentials.

The Munchkin diaper change organizer is a great help when you're changing baby. With eight pockets for diapers, wipes, creams, powders, etc., having this little number by your side when you're changing baby will make the process go a lot smoother, and it frees up the extra shelves and drawers in the diaper changer for other items.

Toy chests can make quick work of organizing the myriad of playthings your little one is sure to accumulate, but they can often be bulky and take up quite a bit of space. If your nursery doesn't allow room for a toy box, consider a toy bag that can be affixed to the diaper changer. Allison Handler, mom of two, hangs several cute ones on the wall that serve as functional decor. The best part is, you can't tell what's in there, so Allison even tucks clothes and extra diapers in them.

Organize the bathroom

Bath time for little ones is a lot more fun with toys, bubbles and don't forget rubber ducky! But that can crowd the bath for other members of the family. Enter Secure Baby's bath-time corner organizer, a mesh bag with different compartments that attach via suction cup to bath and shower walls. Voila — you've got bath time all cleaned up!

One last tip — keep in mind that less sometimes really is more. Be realistic about what you and your baby will actually need and use. Just because there are a million baby products available today doesn't mean you need all of them. Keep your registry list simple, stick to the basics and discover what you might need and use as your baby grows. Just think of all the extra room you'll have to play!

By: Molly Cerreta Smith

An article from SHEKNOWS.COM.

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Nursery That Grows With Baby

Nursery preparation can seem daunting: where do you begin? Here are a few smart steps to get you started.

One size does not fit all

When it comes time to plan for your baby's nursery, don't just hit the shops until you have a plan. A smart plan emphasizes safety and convenience, facilitates organization, and can save you both time and money. Put first things — like safety — first.

As you purchase furnishings for your nursery, remember that little hands like to explore. Cracks, crevices, holes, and slots are there for prodding — virtually nothing is off-limits in the mind of a child. Think safety first when making your wish list for furniture, bedding, and accessories.

Hand-me-down cribs and changing tables initially save on expenses, as long as you make sure they are safe. If the slats on the crib are not up to code, a child could get his head or arm stuck between them and get hurt.

Also remember that gliders can pinch curious fingers, rockers can smash fingers and toes, and flimsy shelves can fall onto baby as she is trying to stand or walk. Toy chests provide storage and additional seating when closed. However, they can injure or even trap a child if not equipped with a special safety hinge that remains open until closed by an adult.

Stow away!

Nursery storage is not limited to the traditional changing table or decorative wooden shelves.

• Provide additional storage for your child's growing wardrobe by installing a customized closet organizer in the nursery closet.

• If you relocate frequently or don't want to install a permanent unit, hang a three tiered crate over the dowel rod in the closet.

• If you have limited wall space, move baby's chest of drawers into the closet to increase floor space. Or invest in a heavy-duty bookcase made from plastic to store toys, clothes and out-of-season clothing in your closet.

• Use under-bed storage to store baby clothes that are out of season, too big or outgrown. Keep an extra one on hand for outgrown clothes, then take to your favorite charity, resale shop, or hand down to relatives when full.

• Make a home for all those treasures you will want to keep for years to come. Photographs, baby's footprints, and other memories can be stored in a box under baby's bed, filed on a regular basis.

• Don't forget the little things in life, because they truly do multiply. Rattles, teethers, socks, mittens and anything with small parts will take over the living areas in your home if you don't contain them from the very start. Clear plastic shoeboxes hold all types of small items for baby. Invest in boxes with good-fitting lids so that you don't have frequent spills on the nursery floor. Plastic boxes with hinged lids carry blocks, locking rings, and bath toys for an active child.

• Corral the plethora of stuffed animals you will quickly accrue by hanging a toy hammock in the child's room, or use a doll playpen. If you would like to store toys that are not frequently used, wrap a tension rod or dowel with Velcro, then wedge it between floor and ceiling. The furry toys stick to the Velcro, adding height and dimension to your room.

Ages and stages

Bear in mind that your baby will not stay little for long. Your newborn will quickly outgrow a bassinet, so if you don't have room for one, consider using a Moses basket or heavy-duty stroller. Both are small, easily stored and portable.

• Try to stay a step ahead of your baby's exploration by baby proofing before he arrives home from the hospital. You are never completely prepared for crawling, pulling up, sitting or walking. Each baby develops at a different rate, and although your baby is not sitting up yet, he soon will be. Maybe he'll be a roller and will roll into a fan or humidifier on the nursery floor. Be prepared for anything by organizing in advance for safety. You'll soon be so busy with the daily routine of feeding, bathing and cuddling your baby that these milestones will creep up on you when you least expect it.

• Once baby begins to crawl and pull up, you will probably want to move stacked clothes and toiletries from the changing table to a closet or high ledge where they can't be rearranged by your little decorator. Convert the changing table to a toy shelf. Remove the changing pad after your child grows too big, securing the straps underneath. You now have additional shelving for toys or stuffed animals.

• Nurture your child's need for independence by hanging a second clothes rod in the nursery closet (or use a hanging crate as described above). This allows toddlers to help decide what to wear, reducing the temptation to climb and reach favorite outfits.

• Storing toys in plastic tubs eliminates clutter, but it also teaches your child to pick up on a regular basis. Tape or glue colorful pictures or stickers to describe the contents within. Baby will have fun matching, and it teaches early math and language skills.

• Purchase a set of colorful stacking bins. Use in a single layer when baby is small, then stack two and three high as she grows. Keep them in the kitchen, by the phone, in the living room and bathroom. They're practically indestructible and grow with the needs of your baby.

Closing thoughts

Planning for the arrival of your first baby can be fun, creative and practical. Be as frivolous or frugal as you like, and still be well-organized. Plan, shop, and plan some more. Remember that you can always change your system at any time when it stops working for you and your child.

Keep an eye out for creative uses of wicker baskets, baby wipe containers and other things to contain the clutter in your nursery. No matter how much you organize it, you'll find that it mysteriously multiplies, taking over your entire house. But don't worry — by that time, you'll be so enchanted by your little one that you won't mind at all.

You will grow with the flow of things, adapting your standards to focus on more important things, like rocking, singing, bathing, and catching stolen moments with your baby.

By: Debbie Williams

An article from SHEKNOWS.COM.

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A Gender-Neutral Disney Nursery: The Lion King
If you’re searching around for a unique gender-neutral baby nursery theme, and you also happen to be a fan of (ahem) Disney, here’s a cute idea: The Lion King!
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8 Tips for a Healthier, Eco-Friendly Baby Nursery
If you’re committed to a green lifestyle (or if you want to start being more eco-conscious), it’s only natural to take this approach with your baby, too. But it can feel like an overwhelming goal when there’s so much stuff to buy — so much furniture and clothes and short-lived baby gear that only lasts a few months before heading to storage. And what’s eco-friendly about that?
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Super Easy DIY Sock Puppet Toddler Craft Activity
My 22-month-old and I recently visited a local indoor play lounge where he was able to freely play in a safe environment while I got some work done thanks to their free WiFi. During our visit, he also got to create a pumpkin using felt stickers and a paper plate and he even made his very own sock puppet! These crafts were included with the price of admission for a day of play, but best of all, my baby boy was able to create something of his own and do a hands-on activity.
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The Best Advice from a Million Huggies Fans
To celebrate one million fans, we're sharing your best tips!
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Building Your Baby's Nest Infographic
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How To Child-Proof Once Baby Is Walking
Finally got a walker? Woohoo! Consider those first steps a sign it's time to step up your game in the toddler-proofing department  if you haven't already. So where should you start? "It's important to see your home from your tot's new perspective," says Debra Holtzman, author of "The Safe Baby: A Do-It-Yourself Guide to Home Safety and Healthy Living." "Get down on your hands and knees to get a bird's eye view of the problems."

Alison Rhodes, who founded SafetyMom.com and operates a child-proofing business in Connecticut, New York and New Jersey, says baby will pull everything within reach. "So be mindful of window cords, curtains and tablecloths. Baby's new exploring skills mean you should also be extra-careful to close doors to rooms that are off-limits," she says. Consider covering door knobs with old socks, which makes them difficult for baby to grasp.

And that's not all. Our experts weigh in on all the toddler-proofing precautions you should take to keep your child safe:

Around the house:
  • Install window guards. A window guard should prevent the window from opening more than four inches. Window coverings should also be cordless. Check out WindowCoverings.org for advice and a free retrofit safety kit.
  • Secure heavy furniture, paintings and even televisions to the walls to prevent them from tipping or falling.
  • Raise breakables out of reach (read: higher than you think).
  • All stairs should have baby gates on the top and bottom.
  • Remove all potential choking hazards (as a rule, if the object can fit in an empty toilet roll, it's not safe).
  • Cushion all furniture edges with corner guards.
  • Block electrical outlets with furniture or outlet covers.
  • Elevate plants out of reach (falling leaves also can be a hazard).
  • Install a lock on doors to exercise rooms and home offices, where potential dangers abound.

In the nursery:
  • Drop crib mattress to the lowest position.
  • Remove mobile from above the crib; baby can now stand up and reach it.
  • Move crib away from windows.
  • Switch to toy chests without lids or with lightweight removable lids; children can get trapped.

In the kitchen:
  • Store appliances instead of displaying them on countertops; baby may now be able to reach and pull.
  • Install safety latches on the refrigerator, freezer, and oven door if you haven't already.
  • Install guards on stove and oven knobs _ and always turn pot handles toward the back wall.
  • Install a safety latch on all low cabinets and drawers.
  • Store all cleaning products out of sight and reach.
  • Lock away plastic wraps and tie bags in knots to avoid strangling and suffocating hazards.
  • Secure knives with safety latches.
  • Remove fridge magnets; they're potential choking hazards.

In the bathroom:
  • Remove all appliances with cords, including hair dryers, flat irons, etc.
  • Secure toilet with a safety lock.
  • Secure medicine cabinet, and store shampoos and other bath items instead of leaving them in the shower.

In the garage and backyard:
  • Install an auto-reverse motion sensor on garage door so it will recoil if it detects movement.
  • If you have a pool, install a four-sided isolation fence that's at least five feet high and a locked cover on the hot tub.
  • Install safety latches and locks on all sliding glass doors.

For pregnancy and parenting advice, tools, photos, and more, visit TheBump.com

© 2013, TheBump.com

Source: TheBump.com


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Stock Baby's Book Shelf
Parents share their favorite books to read to baby. These are must-haves for the nursery! 

"The Very Hungry Caterpillar" by Eric Carle

"My husband reads 'The Very Hungry Caterpillar' to our daughter every night. She loves the colors, and the book is big, so it's easy to see all the pictures."  
  SportyMrs.23

"The Monster at the End of This Book" by Jon Stone

"We pick books that have very few words per page, clear pictures and fun stories about mom or dad and baby. One of our favorite books is 'The Monster at the End of This Book' by Jon Stone. We also like 'I Love You Through and Through' by Bernadette Rossetti-Shustak and 'The Going to Bed Book' by Sandra Boynton." 
  futrkingsley

"Where the Wild Things Are" by Maurice Sendak

"We have 'older-kid' books that we read to our son, like 'Where the Wild Things Are.' We also have 'The Giving Tree,' 'Where the Sidewalk Ends' and 'Love You Forever' on our reading list. Sometimes we need stories that are a little longer because they help calm him - he lays his ear to my chest and we read." 
  PKW

"Hugs and Kisses" by Christophe Loupy

"I read "Hugs and Kisses" by Christophe Loupy aloud when I was pregnant with my daughter. I plan to do it again with my second baby." 
  stacey1279

"Good Night, Gorilla" by Peggy Rathmann

"'Good Night, Gorilla' was my daughter's first favorite book. I think the deep-purple drawings appealed to her way before she could listen to and understand a story." 
  kmhunt11

"Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet!" by Dr. Seuss

"'Wet Pet, Dry Pet, Your Pet, My Pet!' by Dr. Seuss is great. The version I have has different textures that my kids can touch. They love it!" 
  LMK8605

"On the Night You Were Born" by Nancy Tillman

"I had a book-themed baby shower, and someone gave me the book 'On the Night You Were Born.' It's so good it made me cry!" 
  ashleylach

"Where Is Baby's Belly Button?" by Karen Katz

"I highly recommend 'Where Is Baby's Belly Button?' by Karen Katz. My twins are eight months old and can already turn the pages and lift the flaps. We probably read that book 10 times a day _ they can't get enough." 
  Gswans

"If You Give a Mouse a Cookie" by Laura Numeroff

"I love Laura Numeroff's books: 'If You Give a Mouse a Cookie,' 'If You Give a Pig a Pancake,' 'If You Give a Moose a Muffin'.... I already bought the entire series to read to my baby." 
  amber&tommy2010

"We're Going on a Bear Hunt" by Michael Rosen

"We just got 'We're Going on a Bear Hunt' the other day. Both of my sons are thrilled with it. It's repetitive, so they can recite it, and it's easy to make up motions to go along with it." 
  alli2672

"Press Here" by Herve Tullet

"I've been telling parents about this book because it's super-awesome and pretty interactive! It's tons of fun and great to read to a group of kids. It's like magic."
  ShaunMcBoof

"Chicka Chicka Boom Boom" by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault

"It's an awesome book for learning the alphabet. I bought it for my daughter last week, and we've read it about 1,000 times already." 
  proudarmywife08

(For pregnancy and parenting advice, tools, photos, and more, visit TheBump.com.)

©  2012, TheBump.com

Source: TheBump.com 
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True Blue Baby: Designing a Nursery Around Color
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<font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">From Living Space</span><br><br>Few rooms are as exciting to decorate as a baby's nursery. Though parents are full of anticipation for the arrival of their little bundle of joy, trying to find just the right color and design for the nursery can be overwhelming. Rather than heading toward cartoon characters or baby motifs, soon-to-be-parents can start their decorating decisions using vivid color&nbsp;

















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 like the robin's egg blue in the beautiful baby's room pictured.
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A starting point

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Using color as a starting point for décor opens up a field of design possibilities. With a color that departs from the standard nursery playbook, the look is fresh and current and can play to a variety of themes. If you select blue as your color, avoid traditional baby blue in favor of another shade&nbsp;

















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 medium blue, for example&nbsp;

















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 that is suited for either a girl or a boy.
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Making a contemporary color choice like this also gives parents more options if they're waiting until delivery to find out the gender of their baby. It provides them a way to be ready for baby with a room that's both beautiful and appropriate for either gender.
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Nonstandard touches
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The nursery pictured is an inviting room for parents, too. With the overstuffed chair in a coordinated color, mom and dad will have a comfy spot for late-night feedings. On the windows, ivory background drapes with a pale blue floral print lighten up the blue walls. A valance of pale blue and yellow stripes tops the floral print of the window panels. The cream-colored ceiling and light beige carpeting help to keep the room light and from becoming too heavy from the blue on the walls. The room's focal point, a simple iron rail crib with blue draping, creates a perfect spot for a mobile of tiny bluebirds.
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A shot of elegance
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Elegant crystal sconces flank the crib, giving the room soft light. For more elegance, a chandelier is brought out into the room with a chain and hung to light the dresser that does double duty as a changing table. By repurposing the dresser as a changing table, the parents are sure to be ready when baby becomes toddler and needs more storage space, and they save money, too. A shelf above the dresser conveniently stores changing necessities and keeps them out of the way of little hands&nbsp;

















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 and can be used later to display accessories once baby is out of diapers.
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Dreams take flight
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Fun and trendy accessories help to feather baby's little blue nest. Bird motif prints complement the bird mobile and echo the bird theme from the robin's egg blue on the walls. A fanciful peacock pattern on the blue painted short dresser next to the upholstered chair keeps the bird theme from becoming too cute. For balance, a vase of peacock feathers carries the theme to the other side of the room.
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With a strong color as your anchor, decorating the nursery can follow the cues of the color instead of standard baby themes. Adding traditional upholstered furniture and pieces of painted furniture looks elegant and grown up, and offers future benefits, too, which are both helpful and cost-effective. Better still, this approach gives flexibility for expectant parents who want to be surprised when the baby is born&nbsp;

















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 and have a beautiful nursery waiting and ready for the newest family member.
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(For more information, contact Kathryn Weber through her Web site, <a href="http://www.redlotusletter.com">www.redlotusletter.com</a>.)
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0
Seven Tips for Creating Good Feng Shui in Your Baby's Room
Getting ready for a new baby requires a lot of thought and planning, from what diapers to choose to decoration of the baby's room. Today's parents want to create a haven for their little one that helps their baby feel comforted and nurtured, as well as stimulated enough to thrive. Increasingly, parents are incorporating feng shui, the Chinese art of placement, to ensure that baby has not only an attractive but also a harmonious environment.

To maximize the energy in a baby's room, there are several important factors to consider, such as room location, safety, colors, and furniture arrangement. These make up the foundation of good feng shui in the nursery. Plus, using feng shui may even help make babies less fussy, feel more comfortable in their surroundings, and promote their health and well-being.

TIPS

1. Select a good location for the baby's bedroom.

An infant should have a bedroom that's not over a garage or other empty space. The bedroom also shouldn't be located where there's excessive noise that might prevent proper rest.

2. Bed placement is important.

Put the baby's bed on a solid wall across from the door, with the head of the crib against the wall, rather than lengthwise, just as you would a regular bed. This supports the baby's head and provides a feeling of security. Too often, parents put the long side of the crib against the wall instead of the head. Avoid placing the bed against a wall that's shared with a bathroom, storage area, or utility-type room.

3. Opt for soothing colors.

Because deep sleep is necessary for healthy growth, be sure to select restful, muted colors vs. bright hues that can be overstimulating. Select color palettes that are close to one another and harmonious in feng shui terms, such as green and blue, white and beige, or pink and yellow.

4. Create soft movement in the room.

To create good, but soft energy and movement, hang mobiles close to a window to move gently in the breeze, and keep soft music playing in the room. Avoid placing a baby under a ceiling fan, as this can disrupt the infant's body energy.

5. Watch for pointed objects.

Make sure there are no hard corners from dressers or changing tables pointed at the baby's head or body. Move these to another part of the room and pointed away from the bed.

6. Select design motifs with care.

Nature designs are excellent and promote growth. Animal designs should be chosen carefully with only soft and cuddly animals selected vs. aggressive ones, even when they are made for a baby's room. Make sure the designs have no harsh points, such as arrows, crosses, diamonds, or triangles. Motifs with fish are fine as long as the watery theme is not overly dominant.

7. Keep lighting balanced.

During the day, the light in a baby's room should neither be too bright or too dark. Install blinds that can be lowered or raised as needed to keep the room at a pleasant level of lighting (being sure to keep cords out of your baby's reach). If the room is too bright, the baby won't rest deeply.



Source: Living Space


0
Health Tip: Toddler-Proof Baby's Bed
Keeping your toddler's bed safe will help everyone sleep more soundly at night.

The Cleveland Clinic offers these safety tips for your toddler's bed:

- Remove bumper pads and stuffed animals from the crib, as the toddler can use them to climb out.
- Take out any objects with strings that could accidentally become wrapped around a toddler's neck.
- Inspect the room for anything close to your toddler's bed that is within reach, including blinds, curtains, objects on the dresser or wall hangings.
- If your toddler is very active, consider moving him or her to a toddler bed from the crib.

Copyright © 2013HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Source: HealthDay
0
Dads Nest, Too
<img src="http://images.newscred.com/14a4ef424166faf503b08daf77749994" height="333" width="500">
<font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br>By Robert Nickell, McClatchy-Tribune</span><br><br></span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Nesting is a word predominately used to describe female behavior 
prior to giving birth. It can be defined by behaviors such as: getting 
the house in order, setting up the nursery and creating an ambience in 
the household to prepare for the arrival of the new baby. But what does 
nesting mean to me, the dad? And how can it be defined by men?</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">The first and most important aspect of nesting for the dad-to-be is 
to support the mom in her decisions and help to make sure each and every
 task gets accomplished completely. Be prepared for the possibility 
you’ll be asked to paint the nursery, and then repaint it when the color
 didn’t come out quite right. This also includes building the crib, the 
playpen, the swing, the strollers and any other baby product that comes 
needing assembling. (That’s most of them, by the way.)</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">But it also means that it’s time to get the house in order and finish
 all of those lingering projects you’ve been slowly working on for a 
year. It’ll be time to review or establish a life insurance policy, a 
living trust and a long term college fund for the new baby. Check on the
 status of smoke alarms and light bulbs throughout the house. You’ll 
want to be prepared for anything and everything.</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">During dad’s nesting phase, he should also start reading books about 
daddyhood and taking some classes on fatherhood, too. You’ll want to 
know what to expect from your pregnant wife and also from your baby once
 you bring him or her home. It’s also important to try and get caught up
 on work, so you can take some time off. Bank some sleep if you can, 
too; you need to be well rested going into the hospital. Heads up: The 
first six weeks of having a newborn is like living in a 24/7 casino. At 
that point, trying to get caught up on any chores around the house, 
including such small tasks as oiling squeaky doors (which you might want
 to plan to do as part of you prep work) or tightening screws on cabinet
 handles, will feel utterly impossible.</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Of my many concerns that came to me during nesting, the most 
important was safety. I wanted to be sure the cabinets and shelves were 
securely fastened to the walls. Picture frames could not just drop off 
the walls and hurt my new baby. I wanted the crib to be super-duper 
sturdy, and all nuts and bolts tightened beyond the normal strength of 
humans. I was concerned about the bathtub and making sure the sliding 
door was removed and that the faucet had a cover, and that all of our 
home’s cabinets had safety latches. Of course I had to go “all over” the
 house with a can of WD-40 to eliminate all squeaks, and possible creaks
 in the doors, cabinets and windows. Finally, my concern was the garage.
 Where was all the “stuff” — strollers, portable cribs, toys, etc. — 
going to go? So sweeping and reorganizing the garage was a must.</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Preparing for a baby is fun. Enjoy each moment you spend struggling 
to build that changing table with seemingly too many pieces and 
confusing instructions. Those nine months will fly by and before you 
know it you’ll be bringing your new baby home.</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">The final piece of nesting for dad is to be prepared for the 
hospital. Know the route you’ll drive (and a backup route) and have your
 “daddy pack” stocked and ready to go at a moment’s notice.</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Robert Nickell, aka Daddy Nickell, father of seven, offers his five 
cents-worth of advice to expectant and new parents. Daddy Nickell is the
 founder of Daddy &amp; Company,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.daddyncompany.com/">www.daddyncompany.com</a>,
 delivery room duds and daddy gear for dads, and the Daddyscrubs.com 
blog where he covers topics about parenting and the latest baby and kids
 gear, all from a dad's perspective.</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Read more at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.daddyncompany.com/">www.daddyncompany.com</a>.</span></font></p><p><br><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Image: Getty Images<br></span></font></p><br>

<img src="http://pixel.newscred.com/px.gif?key=YXJ0aWNsZT1jNzY3Mzg3ZDUxOWYwMTA5MDljOGU2ODNiMjM2N2E0NiZub25jZT01M2Q5MmMwOS0zMTg0LTQ1MzYtOWE0ZC1iMjc1NzMxNzA2NmUmcHVibGlzaGVyPWVmOTYwNjg3Zjk3ODMwMmFlYzk1YTcwOWY2NTI1ZmNi"/>
0
Five Tricks to Declutter Your Nursery
<img src="http://images.newscred.com/1fb850f034baac570dcb56f8bf4dae3a" height="333" width="500">
<font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="font-weight: bold;"><br>By Sarah Newell, TheBump.com</span><br><br></span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Keep your nursery looking as clean and organized as the day you came home from the hospital.&nbsp;Amanda </span>Wiss, the founder of&nbsp;Urban Clarity, a professional organizing company, shares her top five tips for creating a tidy nursery.</font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold;">1. Buy storage-friendly furniture</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Get a crib with drawers underneath or buy a crib skirt and some 
under-bed boxes, which are great for stashing all those excess diapers 
and wipes. Still short on storage? Consider a cube system like the IKEA 
Expedit, which can grow with your child and be outfitted with drawers 
and doors to hold toys and books on the bottom and clothes they're 
growing into or have outgrown on the top.</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold;">2. Trick out your closet</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Use every inch of space already available in your nursery by 
maximizing your closet's storage. Little outfits are short, so double 
your closet space easily using a double-hang closet rod on one side. 
Then use a portion of your closet to create flexible shelving by adding a
 sweater bag. Both can be found at&nbsp;The Container Store. Use Kid's 
Huggable Hangers — they conserve precious closet space, and tiny outfits
 don't slip off.</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold;">3. Containerize everything</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Find attractive open bins for the shelves of your changing table and 
give each bin a specific category. Inside your closet you'll want to use
 clear, stackable containers so you can see exactly what's there. Label 
them with size and season. For example, seeing "12-month, summer 
clothes" is a lot more helpful than having to take down a huge bin of 
hand-me-downs from the top shelf and then having to dig through. 
Important: Whatever you do, skip the toy bin! It just becomes a 
repository for all the tiny pieces, and ends up with stuff on top of it,
 so your child will never be able to open it to retrieve those stuffed 
animals anyway.</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold;">4. Go vertical</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Have a small nursery? No problem! Utilize your vertical space — backs
 of doors and even the walls are often overlooked areas. Have excess 
toiletries or tiny shoes? Put an over-the-door shoe bag with clear 
pockets on the inside of your closet door so that you can 
compartmentalize all the small stuff and keep it from cluttering up your
 surfaces. Stick the thermometer in the top row right next to the 
Infants' Tylenol, so next time your baby has a fever in the middle of 
the night you know exactly how to find it (and it'll be too high for 
them to reach as they grow!). Have a ton of pictures or other keepsakes 
to display? Don't clutter your dresser — hang floating shelves on the 
wall to show off your treasures. It will look intentional instead of 
haphazard, and once your child is more mobile, he won't be able to 
destroy them so easily.</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">5. Toss the junk</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Having a baby often means you're showered with gifts. But that 
doesn't mean you have to keep and love everything Cousin Gertrude gave 
you. Take a picture of your kiddo wearing the item or playing with it, 
write her a thank-you note and put it in the outbound pile. As a parent,
 you need to constantly manage both the inflow and outflow of stuff in 
your space, so dedicate a bag or two for things that are no longer in 
active use, and once they are full, get them out. Store the items that 
you love that make the cut for a future child, but pass others along to a
 mommy friend with different taste or donate them. Swimming in excess 
samples from the hospital? Stash a few in your diaper bag, use up the 
ones you love and toss the rest! You don't need random stuff you'll 
rarely use.</span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><br></span></font></p><font size="4" style="font-weight: normal;"><span style="font-family: Arial;">

</span></font><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">For pregnancy and parenting advice, tools, photos, and more, visit <a href="http://TheBump.com">TheBump.com.</a></span></font></p><p style="font-weight: normal;"><br><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Image: Getty Images<a href="http://TheBump.com"><br></a></span></font></p>

<img src="http://pixel.newscred.com/px.gif?key=YXJ0aWNsZT00OTM3Nzg4ZGYwMzBlZjg2MTZjNmYxMzI5NTE4ODE4ZiZub25jZT05OTNiMWVkNS0wMTkzLTQyM2QtYTc2Ni1lMmFmOGYyMjA1YmYmcHVibGlzaGVyPWVmOTYwNjg3Zjk3ODMwMmFlYzk1YTcwOWY2NTI1ZmNi" alt="" class="nc_pixel" height="1" width="1"/><br>
0
Top 10 Nursery Must-Haves Before Baby Is Born
<font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="font-weight: bold;">By Jeana Lee Tahnk</span><br><br></span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
	   There is so much excitement surrounding the impending birth of a 
baby that sometimes the nine months just fly by. OK, maybe not the 
morning sickness phase, but after that, time seems to accelerate until 
the birth day. Each of my three pregnancies went by quickly, but it's 
funny how my level of preparedness decreased dramatically with each 
progressive pregnancy.
</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
	   With my first pregnancy, I read all the books nightly, kept a 
pregnancy journal, bought tiny little onesies, washed them in the 
gentlest baby detergent, arranged the changing table with diapers and 
wipes and had a fully stocked nursery. All at around seven months 
pregnant.
</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
	   During my second pregnancy, I was busy with a toddler in tow, so 
naturally, I didn't have as much energy and time. Nonetheless, I still 
managed to get some hand-me-downs and stock up on the essentials with 
probably a month to spare.
</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
	   Pregnancy  No. 3 was a whole different scenario. We had gotten rid 
of our crib after our second child moved to a regular bed and we didn't 
have even the barest baby essentials. With just a few weeks left in my 
pregnancy, we realized we needed to get into baby mode—and fast. Those 
were busy weeks! Luckily, we got it all done in time and had a stocked 
nursery when the baby was born.
</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
	   Based on personal experience, here are 10 things I'd recommend stocking in your nursery:
</span></font></p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
</span></font><ul><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Diapers:</strong> Of course! When you're changing these 10 
to 12 times a day at the beginning, these are a stock-up must-have. I'm 
talking multiple boxes of size 1 diapers. Yes, you do go through that 
many. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Wipes:</strong> Necessary accompaniment to items mentioned above. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Wipes warmer: </strong>Some people see this as unnecessary,
 but I personally used one for each baby. Those middle of the night 
diaper changes are a lot less jarring when the wipes are nice and warm. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Onesies:</strong> Regardless of what time of year it is, 
short- and long-sleeve onesies are the easiest to change your little 
baby in and out of. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Waterproof changing pads:</strong> I put these anywhere I 
change the baby's diaper to protect whatever I'm doing the changing on. 
And they're also great to stuff one into your diaper bag as added 
insurance during your one of many daily diaper changes. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Socks:</strong> I try to use footie pants or zippered 
sleepers whenever possible, but if not, socks are a must-have for 
keeping those little tootsies warm. They also make a great stand-in as 
mittens to keep babies from scratching their faces. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Hand sanitizer: </strong>I bought several pumps and 
dispersed them around the house, especially at the front door. With so 
many visitors and people who want to touch and hold the baby, hand 
sanitizer is your friend. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Nursing pillows: </strong>Between ones passed on from 
friends and ones I held onto, I somehow ended up with four nursing 
pillows by my third baby. While that seems excessive, it was awfully 
nice to have one in each of the main rooms I was nursing in, without 
having to constantly schlep one upstairs and downstairs. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Receiving blankets:</strong> I always had a few receiving blankets on hand to use as swaddlers, blankets, play mats, burp cloths. </span></font></li><li><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><strong>Burp cloths: </strong>Speaking of burp cloths, these are a 
must have for those spitty-uppy babies and to wipe the constant drool 
that starts flowing at around four months. </span></font></li></ul><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
</span></font><p><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;">
	  There are lots of lists of "essentials" out there, but the truth is 
that you don't need much for a newborn. The items listed here are 
recommendations, and of course, there are things you can't get by 
without, such as diapers and wipes. But ultimately, lots and lots of 
love is what you'll be fully stocked with after baby arrives, and that 
certainly goes a long way. <br></span></font></p><p><br><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"></span></font></p><p><br></p><h1>Read More by Jeana Lee Tahnk</h1><h1 id="title"><a href="https://www.mommyanswers.huggies.com/article/John_Mary_Apple_Indigo_How_We_Chose_a_Name"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: Arial;"><span style="font-weight: normal;">John? Mary? Apple? Indigo? How We Chose a Name</span></span></font></a></h1><h1 id="title"><span style="font-weight: normal;"><font size="4"><a href="https://www.mommyanswers.huggies.com/article/Tips_for_Making_Sure_Your_Baby_Has_the_Right_Diaper">Tips for Making Sure Your Baby Has the Right Diaper</a>
                </font></span></h1>
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